2022 CSM AND CSPO CLASSES ARE $650

Toggle Menu

Insights > Metrics > Three Reports Expert Scrum Masters Use

Three Reports Expert Scrum Masters Use

Intro Reports are an invaluable tool to monitor the health of your system. You use them as the basis for meaningful conversations with the team and stakeholders. They assist you in evaluating your system and understanding where to tweak processes. The three core reports every Scrum Master should understand and use are the burndown, burnup, […]

By

April 05, 2022

Intro

Reports are an invaluable tool to monitor the health of your system. You use them as the basis for meaningful conversations with the team and stakeholders. They assist you in evaluating your system and understanding where to tweak processes. The three core reports every Scrum Master should understand and use are the burndown, burnup, and throughput. These three metrics visualize current progress and past output over time.

In this blog we’ll explore the purpose of each metric, how to read each chart, and how to create each chart.

Burndown

Purpose

The burndown chart shows your progress toward completing a group of work items within a set timeframe. It tracks the work remaining versus the total scope on a daily basis. The burndown is a simple way to determine whether you will complete everything within the designated timebox. Using this chart, you can continually assess whether your current committed timebox and scope are on track. If you see an increased risk that you may not complete all the work or will be completing all the work before the timebox ends, it’s time for a conversation with the team and the stakeholders so you can collectively adjust the plan (often by changing scope – removing work or adding new work items – or adapting the team’s  approach).

You can use the burndown chart for the sprint backlog or the release backlog.

Reading the Chart

Setting Up the Chart

Burnup

Purpose

The burnup chart is similar to the burndown chart; one key difference is in the display. Rather than showing progress as descending, it displays progress as ascending. Unlike the burndown, the burnup displays the work scope on a separate line. This makes scope changes very obvious.

Like the burndown, the burnup provides a visual representation of a completed work compared with its total scope. Using the burnup is another way to track your team’s progress towards completion and identify potential problems.

Reading the Chart

Setting Up the Chart

Throughput

Purpose

The throughput chart show the items completed across a timespan within the recent past (e.g., the previous month). This is also called a run chart or a control chart. The timespan is broken down into smaller, consistent timeframes. These timeframes can be weekly, daily, monthly, or hourly. The y-axis shows the items completed within each time frame. The x-axis shows each time frame. Use this report to see fluctuations in throughput. Some fluctuation is normal. Pay attention to trends. Is the throughput trending up, down, or is it fairly consistent throughout? This data is a good tool to assess predictability. If you detect noticeable trend changes, you have a solid foundation for an in-depth conversation with the team, so you can collaboratively evaluate and figure out the source(s) of the variances and make modifications to your system to improve.

Reading the Chart

Setting Up the Chart

Conclusion

The burnup, burndown, and throughput charts are all simple from Scrum Masters to set up, maintain, and produce. They are also easy for metric-illiterate folks to understand. I highly recommend Scrum Masters master these three reports. Learn more about our Scrum Master training options to advance your skills.

You Might Also Like